Festival Series 4 — Shostakovich, Schumann and Dvorak
Jun
25
7:30 pm19:30

Festival Series 4 — Shostakovich, Schumann and Dvorak

  • Gesa Power House Theatre

The 2016 Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival comes to a close with a program any Hollywood producer would admire.

  • Shostakovich, String Quartet in A flat, Op. 118
  • Schumann, Violin Sonata in A minor, Op. 105
  • Dvorak, Piano Quartet in E flat, Op. 87

What makes a good blockbuster? Worthy protagonists, an implacable villain, equal measures of suspense, uncertainty and volatility, and, eventually, a happy ending. WWCMF brings these plot devices together in a program of music by Shostakovich, Schumann and Dvorak.

Our protagonists are Dmitri Shostakovich, a lonely artist in Soviet Era Russia; Robert Schumann, a passionate but unstable romantic; and Antonin Dvorak, a folk hero who gave a voice to the Czech people. The villains are the Soviet machine and crises of identity in the face of overwhelming odds. The music is in turns scenic, terrifying, resolute and, ultimately, heroically triumphant. When the final credits roll, you will already be able to taste the sequel…

2017: The 10-year Anniversary of WWCMF… This time, it’s personal!

Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Christina McGann, violin; Stephen Miahky, violin; Philip Payton, violin; Maria Sampen, violin; Sally Singer, cello; and Wei-Han Wu, piano.

Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Christina McGann, violin; Philip Payton, violin; Maria Sampen, violin; Sally Singer Tuttle, cello; and Wei-Han Wu, piano.

Doors open at 6:30pm

Festival Series 4

Tonight’s performance is made possible by the generosity of Ben and Landra Macy.

 

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)

String Quartet in A flat, Op. 118

   1. Andante

   2. Allegretto furioso

   3. Adagio

   4. Allegretto – Andante

 

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)

Sonata in A minor for piano and violin, Op. 105

   1. Mit leidenschaftlichem Ausdruck

   2. Allegretto

   3. Lebhaft


Intermission


Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)

Quartet for Piano and Strings in E flat, Op. 87

   1. Allegro con fuoco

   2. Lento

   3. Allegro moderato, grazioso

   4. Finale. Allegro ma non troppo

 

Tasting Music 4 — Shostakovich, String Quartet in A flat, Op. 118
Jun
24
6:00 pm18:00

Tasting Music 4 — Shostakovich, String Quartet in A flat, Op. 118

  • TERO Estates Winery

Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)
String Quartet in A Flat, Op. 118
I.   Andante
II.  Allegretto furioso
III. Adagio
IV. Allegretto — Andante

The fifteen string quartets of Dmitri Shostakovich offer the listener a more intimate window into the life of the greatest Russian composer of the Soviet Era. While many of his symphonies were composed to appease the Kremlin’s censors and serve as Soviet propaganda, the quartets express more personal sentiments.

The Tenth Quartet, composed some eleven years after the death of Stalin, is by Shostakovich standards more at ease than some of his other works. There is, of course, a terrifying march episode, the second movement, but somehow, the effects are less calamitous than in works such as his Eighth Quartet, heard during the first season of WWCMF back in 2008. This profoundly beautiful work of hymns and dances will bring the 2016 Tasting Music Series to a close, set against the backdrop of the spectacular vineyards of TERO Estates Winery.

Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Stephen Miahky, violin; and Philip Payton, violin.

Doors open at 5:00pm

Portrait of an Artist 4 — Wei-Han Wu, piano
Jun
23
6:00 pm18:00

Portrait of an Artist 4 — Wei-Han Wu, piano

  • Foundry Vineyards

For the final Portrait of an Artist recital of the 2016 Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival, you are in for a treat. Taiwanese-American pianist, Wei-Han Wu has established himself as one of the most versatile musicians in a crowded field. At home in the sometimes disparate worlds of art song, contemporary music, chamber music and concert repertoire, Wei-Han brings a cheerful sense of camaraderie to his every performance. At roughly 90 pounds soaking wet, do not underestimate Wei-Han at the dinner table… No one knows where he puts it, but he will keep eating long after you have thrown in the towel.

Tonight, however, Wei-Han Wu will provide you with a feast in works for piano by Liszt, Gershwin, Rachmaninov, Bach and more. We close the Portrait of an Artist Series for 2016 at the always air-conditioned and stylish Foundry Vineyards gallery and tasting room.

All selections will be announced from the stage.

Artist: Wei-Han Wu, piano

Commentary: Timothy Christie

Doors open at 5:00pm

Open Rehearsal — Walla Walla Presbyterian Church
Jun
23
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Walla Walla Presbyterian Church

  • Walla Walla Presbyterian Church

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Outreach — Tasting Music For Teens
Jun
22
7:00 pm19:00

Outreach — Tasting Music For Teens

  • Walla Walla Public Library

The Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival invites teen musicians and music lovers to a night of chocolate tasting and music. This is an after hours, teens only event.

Sounds Like Fun! — Walla Walla YMCA
Jun
22
10:00 am10:00

Sounds Like Fun! — Walla Walla YMCA

  • Walla Walla YMCA

Sounds Like Fun! concerts for kids are presented by Columbia REA.

Kid’s concerts are not just for kids.

Our free series of children’s concerts, titled “Sounds Like Fun!”, offer a great way to get more familiar with chamber music. Musicians perform short selections, and bring attention to different aspects of the music like rhythm, melody, harmony and instrumentation. While priority seating goes to the kids, there’s plenty of room for all. Kids’ events run about 45 minutes from start to finish.

Special Event 3 — Beethoven’s Große Fuge, Op. 133
Jun
21
7:00 pm19:00

Special Event 3 — Beethoven’s Große Fuge, Op. 133

  • Whitehouse-Crawford Restaurant

Sometimes Free, Sometimes Learned:

The Late Quartets of Beethoven are hallowed ground in the chamber music repertoire. There are six Late Quartets in all with the Große Fuge standing alone as a single movement. It stands so because Beethoven’s publisher, Matthias Artaria, requested that he compose a more commercially suitable substitute for the final movement of the Op. 130 Quartet in B flat, a role the Große Fuge originally served. In a rare moment of acquiescence, Beethoven obliged his publisher, agreeing to an additional fee for the new finale, and the Große Fuge was published separately with its own opus number, 133.

Why all the fuss? One need hear only about 4 seconds of the fugue’s exposition to discover why. After an introduction largely dependent on octave unison among the four instruments (each instrument is playing the exact same notes, voiced according to the range of the respective instruments; cello, viola, violin 2, violin 1 from lowest to highest), Beethoven unleashes the fugue in fortissimo (as loudly as possible), each voice entering in seeming competition with the last. Can the human ear truly hear detail, or even beauty, amid the seeming chaos of this music?

As I am fond of saying… There’s only one way to find out! This Special Event is not for the faint of heart. It is Beethoven at his most furious and most glorious.

Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Stephen Miahky, violin; and Maria Sampen, violin and Sally Singer Tuttle, cello;

Commentary: Timothy Christie

Doors open at 6:00pm

Sounds Like Fun! — Fort Walla Walla Museum
Jun
21
11:30 am11:30

Sounds Like Fun! — Fort Walla Walla Museum

  • Fort Walla Walla Museum

This Sounds Like Fun! is for kids taking part in the Explorers Kids Camp.

Sounds Like Fun! concerts for kids are presented by Columbia REA.

Kid’s concerts are not just for kids.

Our free series of children’s concerts, titled “Sounds Like Fun!”, offer a great way to get more familiar with chamber music. Musicians perform short selections, and bring attention to different aspects of the music like rhythm, melody, harmony and instrumentation. While priority seating goes to the kids, there’s plenty of room for all. Kids’ events run about 45 minutes from start to finish.

Open Rehearsal — Fort Walla Walla Museum
Jun
21
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Fort Walla Walla Museum

  • Fort Walla Walla Museum

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Open Rehearsal — Whitehouse-Crawford Restaruant
Jun
20
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Whitehouse-Crawford Restaruant

  • Whitehouse-Crawford Restaurant

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Festival Series 3 — Mozart, Copland, Mackey and Poulenc
Jun
18
7:30 pm19:30

Festival Series 3 — Mozart, Copland, Mackey and Poulenc

  • Gesa Power House Theatre

Festival Series 3 is a veritable potpourri of great music. What makes a good potpourri? I think a combination of something sweet, something exotic, something familiar, and something savory balanced in perfect proportion. Here’s an example, brought to you by the parfumerie of WWCMF.

Sweet: Poulenc, Sextet for piano and winds, Op. 100
Exotic: Mackey, Indigenous Instruments for piano, violin, cello, flute and clarinet (1989)
Familiar: Mozart, String Quartet in E flat, K. 428
Savory: Copland, Quiet City for trumpet, english horn and strings (1941)

Smells good to me!

Artists: Sarah Brady, flute; Rodger Burnett, horn; Timothy Christie, viola; Christina Dahl, piano; Billy Ray Hunter, trumpet; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Christina McGann, violin; Stephen Miahky, violin; Philip Payton, violin; Paul Rafanelli, bassoon; Maria Sampen, violin; Kevin Schempf, clarinet; Sally Singer Tuttle, cello; and Dan Williams, oboe/english horn.

Doors open at 6:30pm

Festival Series 3 Program

Tonight’s performance is made possible by the generosity of Iain and Stephanida Christie.

 

Steven Mackey (b. 1956)

Indigenous Instruments for Piano, Violin, Cello, Flute and Clarinet (1989)

   I.

   II.

   III.

 

Francis Poulenc (1899-1963)

Sextet for piano and winds, Op. 100

   1. Allegro vivace

   2. Divertissement: Andantino

   3. Prestissimo


Intermission


Aaron Copland (1900-1990)

Quiet City for Trumpet, English Horn and Strings

 

W. A. Mozart (1756-1791)

String Quartet in E flat, K. 428

   1. Allegro non troppo

   2. Andante con moto

   3. Menuetto and Trio. Allegro

   4. Allegro vivace

 

Tasting Music 3 — Mozart, String Quartet in E Flat, K. 428
Jun
17
6:00 pm18:00

Tasting Music 3 — Mozart, String Quartet in E Flat, K. 428

  • Rôtie Cellars Production Facility

W. A. Mozart (1756-1791)
String Quartet in E flat, K. 428
I.   Allegro non troppo
II.  Andante con moto
III. Menuetto and Trio. Allegro
IV. Allegro vivace

If he was alive today, Mozart would love the Tasting Music Series. He would appreciate the convivial atmosphere, the celebration of music and the opportunity to indulge in fine wine.

While he most certainly wouldn’t be able to pay his tab at the end of the evening, his finances were perpetually in a shambles, we would all step up and cover his share. So, for the third installment of the 2016 Tasting Music Series, we visit Rôtie Cellars Production Facility and raise a glass to Mozart. His String Quartet in E Flat, K. 428 serves as the perfect piece of music for the occasion. Upon hearing this work, Haydn told Mozart’s father, Leopold, “I tell you before God, and as an honest man, that your son is the greatest composer I know, either personally or by reputation…” High praise from the greatest living composer of the day! To Mozart!

 Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Christina McGann, violin; Stephen Miahky, violin; and Sally Singer Tuttle, cello.

Commentary: Timothy Christie

Doors open at 5:00pm

Open Rehearsal — Walla Walla General Hospital
Jun
17
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Walla Walla General Hospital

  • Walla Walla General Hospital

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Portrait of an Artist 3 — Paul Rafanelli, Bassoon
Jun
16
6:00 pm18:00

Portrait of an Artist 3 — Paul Rafanelli, Bassoon

  • Long Shadows Vintners

Different instruments have different evocations. The oboe might bring to mind a lonely shepherd piping a tune to his flock. Flutes and piccolos can trill and chirp like birds. The trumpet signals the advance of an invading army, and so on. What about the bassoon? It has a rich and varied set of associations all its own such as the grandfather in Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf or the awakening of all of nature in Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring. Whether producing a rich baritone sonority or singing high into the treble clef, the bassoon is a versatile instrument.

Here, we have the good fortune to experience the beauty and versatility of the bassoon in the hands of a true master, Paul Rafanelli, bassoonist of the Seattle Symphony. Our setting is the hallowed production room of Long Shadows Vintners. In the future, it is likely the bassoon will come to be associated with lush bordeaux blends, a fitting evocation.

Artists: Paul Rafanelli, bassoon; and Kristin Vining, piano.

Commentary: Timothy Christie

All selections will be announced from the stage.

Doors open at 5:00pm

Open Rehearsal — Liberty Theater, Dayton
Jun
16
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Liberty Theater, Dayton

  • Liberty Theater

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Special Event 2 — Collage
Jun
14
8:00 pm20:00

Special Event 2 — Collage

  • Abeja

The musicians of WWCMF explore a new and exciting venue for the 2016 installment of our annual Collage performance, Abeja. Historically, the grounds and tasting room at Abeja have only been available to guests lucky enough to stay at the Inn. Tonight, Abeja opens its doors to WWCMF, and you will have the chance to enjoy one of the most beautiful settings in the Walla Walla Valley. The production facility also boasts seemingly countless nooks and crannies from which the musicians will surprise and delight you in a continuous tapestry of sound.

What is Collage? It is a style of performing wherein the end of one piece becomes the beginning of the next. There is no pause for applause, or for you to catch your breath. Music from antiquity brushes elbows with music so new, the ink is still wet. Imagine Georg Frederick Handel sitting down for a drink with Jimi Hendrix. Then, Mozart walks in. Party ensues… That’s what Collage feels like.

In the past, WWCMF has presented two performances of Collage, an early and a late show. This season, there is only one opportunity to catch the magic of Collage. Doors will open at 6:30pm and the performance begins at 8pm. Feel free to use the extra time to come and enjoy the scenery, and indulge in some delicious food and wine. The Q will fire up these wood-grilled entree selections: Bare Naked ribs; Tri-tip cooked to perfection with Chimichurri (a green herb sauce); and Quail served with chilled potato salad and house Dijonnaise. Wines by Abeja will be available for purchase by the glass. 

Artists: Sarah Brady, flute; Rodger Burnett, horn; Timothy Christie, violin/viola; Dave Glenn, trombone; Jennifer Goltz, soprano; Billy Ray Hunter, trumpet; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Christina McGann, violin; Stephen Miahky, violin; Philip Payton, violin; Paul Rafanelli, bassoon; Maria Sampen, violin; Kevin Schempf, clarinet; Stephen Schermer, double bass; Sally Singer Tuttle, cello; and Dan Williams, oboe.

Doors open at 6:30pm

Open Rehearsal — Fort Walla Walla Museum
Jun
14
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Fort Walla Walla Museum

  • Fort Walla Walla Museum

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Special Event 1 — Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, piano four-hands
Jun
12
7:00 pm19:00

Special Event 1 — Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring, piano four-hands

  • Foundry Vineyards

Few events in musical history are as (in)famous as the World Premiere of Igor Stravinsky’s ballet, The Rite of Spring. On May 29, 1913 at the Théâtre Des Champs-Elysées in Paris, a riot greeted one of the most important compositions of the 20th century. The conductor on the night of the premiere, Pierre Monteux, recalls “everything available was tossed in our direction, but we continued to play on.” Musicians today regard the story of the premiere as legend, often wistfully dreaming “if only I could have been in the room on that night…” Despite romantic hindsight, we insist that you leave any wilted cabbage or rotten tomatoes at home, as we have no interest in a second riot!

Instead, we will explore this great work through the composer’s version for piano four-hands, featuring virtuoso pianists, Oksana Ezhokina and Christina Dahl. Stravinsky’s masterpiece sounds as strikingly primal and raw as it did over one hundred years ago. We’ll look at the ballet’s kaleidoscopic evocations of nature and pagan ritual, and delve into the rhythmic revolution of Stravinsky’s score. WWCMF is delighted to return to the gallery at Foundry Vineyards for this truly Special Event.

Artists: Christina Dahl, piano; and Oksana Ezhokina, piano.

Commentary: Timothy Christie

Doors open at 6:00pm

Festival Series 2 — Strauss, Baermann and Mendelssohn
Jun
11
7:30 pm19:30

Festival Series 2 — Strauss, Baermann and Mendelssohn

  • Gesa Power House Theatre

For the second performance on the Festival Series, the piano goes silent. In its place are intimate works for strings, clarinet and voice.

The six “Brentano” songs of Richard Strauss, Op. 68, represent a return from the opera house to the concert stage. Each song expresses an aspect of Strauss’ undying love for his wife, Pauline, who was a soprano. Tonight’s vocalist, Jennifer Goltz, has supplied a lovingly arranged setting of three of the six songs for soprano and string quartet.

Next up is the Adagio for clarinet and strings by Heinrich Baermann, a tender expression of affection in which the clarinet sings like the human voice.

The program concludes with the bracing and affecting String Quartet in F minor, Op. 80 by Felix Mendelssohn. If the first half of the program concentrates on love, the second half explores loss. In this case, Mendelssohn, inconsolable at the loss of his beloved sister, Fanny, expresses his grief through music. No lament, this quartet shakes its fists at God, and the result is a virtuosic masterpiece you won’t want to miss.

Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Jennifer Goltz, soprano; Andrew Jennings, violin; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Christina McGann, violin; Stephen Miahky, violin; Maria Sampen, violin; Kevin Schempf, clarinet; and Sally Singer Tuttle, cello.

Doors open at 6:30pm

Festival Series 2 Progam

Tonight’s performance is made possible by the generosity of the VanYserloo family, in loving memory of Barbara; wife, mother, grandmother and avid clarinetist.

 

Richard Strauss (1864-1949)

Selections from the “Brentano Lieder,” Op. 68

Arr. Jennifer Goltz

   2. Ich wollt ein Sträusslein binden

   3. Säusle, liebe Myrthe!

   5. Amor

 

Heinrich Baermann (1784-1847)

Adagio in D flat for clarinet and strings


Intermission


Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

String Quartet in F minor, Op. 80

   1. Allegro vivace assai

   2. Allegro assai

   3. Adagio

   4. Finale: Allegro molto

 

Tasting Music 2 — Mendelssohn, String Quartet in F minor, Op. 80
Jun
10
6:00 pm18:00

Tasting Music 2 — Mendelssohn, String Quartet in F minor, Op. 80

  • Pepper Bridge Winery

Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)
String Quartet in F minor, Op. 80
1   Allegro vivace assai
2   Allegro assai
3   Adagio
4   Finale: Allegro molto

Felix Mendelssohn enjoyed a life of privilege compared to many of his colleagues in the canon of great composers. He had a loving family who gave him every opportunity. Sundays at the Mendelssohn household came complete with a full orchestra assembled to play through young Felix and his sister Fanny’s newest compositions. As a teenager, Mendelssohn churned out a baker’s dozen of String Symphonies, each a gem in its own right, not to mention the masterful Octet and the evocative incidental music to Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. In young adulthood, Mendelssohn would be received by royalty such as Queen Victoria of England, who Mendelssohn accompanied in songs of his own composition (and Fanny’s, though she was not permitted to publish). The narrative would suggest that Felix, a genius to be sure, led a charmed life.

Tasting Music 2 explores his final work, the String Quartet in F minor, Op. 80. Here we find a very different Mendelssohn. Wracked with grief over the death of his beloved sister, Mendelssohn saw his own health decline rapidly. On hiatus to recover in Switzerland, Mendelssohn turned his attention to the medium of the string quartet. His Op. 80 is a work of almost unrelenting anxiety. Through this work we have a glimpse of the composer Mendelssohn might have become had he lived longer. Though inconsolable, Mendelssohn gives us a work of supreme beauty and virtuosity that will leave you breathless. WWCMF returns to Pepper Bridge Winery for this special performance.

Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Andrew Jennings, violin; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; and Maria Sampen, violin.

Commentary: Timothy Christie

Doors open at 5:00pm

Portrait of an Artist 2 — Jennifer Goltz, Soprano
Jun
9
6:00 pm18:00

Portrait of an Artist 2 — Jennifer Goltz, Soprano

  • Canoe Ridge Vineyard

Vocalists, sopranos in particular, are often the subject of playful ribbing among instrumental musicians. After all, the term diva (goddess) was appropriated to describe them. Sometimes we tease singers about rhythm… Hey, counting can be a challenge. Sometimes we tease them about pitch… Nothing an entourage of pianists and vocal coaches can’t fix. It takes a village, right? Well, Portrait of an Artist 2 will be this singer’s riposte to all those years of unfair teasing.

Jennifer Goltz is not your average soprano. She comes armed with a PhD in Music Theory and a truly staggering range from early European cabaret to sacred music by Mozart to the thorniest 20th and 21st Century compositions.

What’s more, you never know when Jennifer might pull out an accordion or ukulele to accompany herself in French cabaret or on a Rossini aria. One thing is for sure, we have a true diva in our midst.

Artists: Jennifer Goltz, soprano; and Kristin Vining, piano.

Commentary: Timothy Christie

All selections will be announced from the stage.

Doors open at 5:00pm

Sounds Like Fun! — Walla Walla Public Library
Jun
9
3:30 pm15:30

Sounds Like Fun! — Walla Walla Public Library

  • Walla Walla Public Library

Sounds Like Fun! concerts for kids are presented by Columbia REA.

Kid’s concerts are not just for kids.

Our free series of children’s concerts, titled “Sounds Like Fun!”, offer a great way to get more familiar with chamber music. Musicians perform short selections, and bring attention to different aspects of the music like rhythm, melody, harmony and instrumentation. While priority seating goes to the kids, there’s plenty of room for all. Kids’ events run about 45 minutes from start to finish.

Open Rehearsal — Columbia REA
Jun
9
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Columbia REA

  • Columbia REA

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Open Rehearsal — Kirkman House Museum
Jun
8
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Kirkman House Museum

  • Kirkman House Museum

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Festival Series 1 — Berners, Reich and Brahms
Jun
7
7:30 pm19:30

Festival Series 1 — Berners, Reich and Brahms

  • Gesa Power House Theatre

The 2016 Festival Series gets underway with the first performance at the Gesa Power House Theatre. As is our tradition, we begin with the World Premiere of a work commissioned for the occasion, a set of duos for two violins by composer, John Berners. Each piece is a miniature paying homage to the collections of violin duos by Béla Bartók and Luciano Berio respectively.

Next, we encounter an American masterpiece of minimalism by Steve Reich, Different Trains for string quartet and tape. Words become melodies that weave together in sometimes hypnotic repetitions. However, the repetitions change subtly, and Reich creates an emotional documentary of heartbreakingly different journeys by train during the 1940’s in America and Europe.

To bring the performance to a close, WWCMF is delighted to welcome back the Volta Piano Trio for the Brahms Piano Trio in B, Op. 8. Nowhere is the Romanticism of Brahms as optimistic or unbridled as in this early masterpiece. Though Brahms revisited the work later in life to correct the “mistakes” of his 21 year-old self, the youthful exuberance of the work’s origin shines through all the same.

Artists: John Berners, Composer; Jennifer Caine, violin; Timothy Christie, violin/viola; Oksana Ezhokina, piano; Andrew Jennings, violin; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Christina McGann, violin; Stephen Miahky, violin; Maria Sampen, violin; Sally Singer Tuttle, cello; and Volta Piano Trio.

Doors open at 6:30pm

Festival Series 1 Program

Tonight’s performance has been made possible by the generosity of John Jamison and Kathy Wildermuth.

 

John Berners (b. 1961)

Duos for Two Violins (2016)

The 2016 WWCMF Commission and World Premiere has been made possible by the generosity of John Jamison and Kathy Wildermuth.

 

Steve Reich (b. 1936)

Different Trains for string quartet and tape (1988)

   1. America—Before the war

   2. Europe—During the war

   3. After the war


Intermission


Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

Piano Trio in B Major, Op. 8 (1889)

   1. Allegro con brio – Tranquillo – In tempo ma sempre sostenuto

   2. Scherzo: Allegro molto – Meno allegro – Tempo primo

   3. Adagio

   4. Finale: Allegro

 

Tasting Music 1 — Steve Reich, Different Trains
Jun
6
6:00 pm18:00

Tasting Music 1 — Steve Reich, Different Trains

  • Charles Smith Wines

Steve Reich (b. 1936)
Different Trains (1988)
1   America — Before the war
2   Europe — During the war
3   After the war

The 2016 Tasting Music Series begins with a minimalist multimedia masterpiece by American composer, Steve Reich. His work, Different Trains for string quartet and tape, explores his childhood riding the rails between New York and Los Angeles. When his parents separated, the young Reich traveled with his nanny back and forth across the country from 1939 to 1942. As a Jew, Reich realized much later in life that had he been living in Europe during that time, he would have been riding a very different train.

Through minimalist techniques and the innovative exploration of speech melody, Reich conceived an incredibly moving score that feels like documentary on one hand and a very personal statement on the other. Tonight’s event will explore minimalism in music, and how a work inherently tied to recorded media can feel alive and resonant. The modern space at Charles Smith Wines provides the perfect setting to take this journey through time and sound.

Artists: Timothy Christie, viola; Norbert Lewandowski, cello; Christina McGann, violin; and Stephen Miahky, violin.

Commentary: Timothy Christie

Doors open at 5:00pm

Open Rehearsal — Walla Walla Presbyterian Church
Jun
6
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Walla Walla Presbyterian Church

  • Walla Walla Presbyterian Church

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Open Rehearsal — Courtyard by Marriott
Jun
4
10:00 am10:00

Open Rehearsal — Courtyard by Marriott

  • Courtyard by Marriott

Reality television has nothing on classical music. Rehearsing in a chamber music ensemble is one of the true joys of a life in music. The spirit of collaboration and creativity abounds.

The wealth of ideas, skills, and ambitions that each musician brings to a musical work comes together to form a unique interpretation, an artistic whole reflecting the various characteristics of the musicians themselves. Rehearsal can also be a furnace of tension, confrontation, bruised egos, and complete vulnerability on the part of the musicians. Behind the starched shirts and polished presentations of the concert stage exists the real world of chamber music.

Open Rehearsals at the Walla Walla Chamber Music Festival are a window into this complex and exciting process. Set in local art galleries and downtown spaces, Open Rehearsals are free, informal, and informative ways to hear classical music in a new way.

Sounds Like Fun! — Dayton Memorial Library
Jun
3
4:00 pm16:00

Sounds Like Fun! — Dayton Memorial Library

  • Dayton Memorial Library

Sounds Like Fun! concerts for kids are presented by Columbia REA.

Kid’s concerts are not just for kids.

Our free series of children’s concerts, titled “Sounds Like Fun!”, offer a great way to get more familiar with chamber music. Musicians perform short selections, and bring attention to different aspects of the music like rhythm, melody, harmony and instrumentation. While priority seating goes to the kids, there’s plenty of room for all. Kids’ events run about 45 minutes from start to finish.